CSG Well Integrity

MYTH

 

THE FACTS

 

 

 

MYTH

 

 

THE FACTS

 

 

 

 

MYTH

 

THE FACTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

MYTH

 

THE FACTS

 

 

MYTH

 

THE FACTS

 

 

 

MYTH

 

 

 

THE FACTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MYTH

 

THE FACTS

All coal seam gas being developed will be exported.

 

Coal seam gas already provides about a third of domestic gas across eastern Australia and

about 95% of gas used in Queensland. Coal seam gas projects being targeted for development in NSW have been earmarked specifically for that state’s domestic market.

 

Gas operations cause gas to migrate into waterbores and aquifers outside the gas-bearing rock formations.

 

Gas wells are constructed in a way that ensures there can be no migration of gas to neighbouring bores and aquifers. It is not in the gas companies’ interests to allow leakage of gas into aquifers. Such leaks would make it difficult to extract the gas and would reduce the amount of gas available for sale.

 

Oil and gas operations are harmful to human health

 

 

CSG is a new industry.

 

The CSG industry has been around for decades, and it has been a significant source of gas production in Queensland for more than 10 years.

 

Coal seam gas is not safe as gas leaks are common.

 

A 2011 wellhead safety report in Queensland surveyed more than 2700 wells. No explosion risks were found and only five leaks large enough to be flammable were found. None of these leaks posed any threat to human health but the companies were required to rectify them.

 

Coal seam gas production activity could cause the Great Artesian Basin to dry up, threatening farming activity.

 

 

The Great Artesian Basin holds about 65 million gigalitres (GL) of water and annual water recharge is estimated to be about 880GL. The actual average volume predicted to be extracted by CSG production is about 75GL. But there could be localised impacts on pressure in some waterbores. In cases where this happens, Queensland CSG producers are required to make good any loss of access to water, ensuring a continued reasonable supply of water to landholders. In NSW, the Namoi Water Study has found that development of the CSG industry in the Gunnedah Basin would not have a large impact on the region’s groundwater levels

 

No one understands hydraulic fracturing (fraccing) or knows the chemicals being used.